You are not logged in.

Standardising differences? Theorising 'identities' and pedagogical approaches to working with diversity

Allard, Andrea 2005, Standardising differences? Theorising 'identities' and pedagogical approaches to working with diversity, in ATEE 2005 : Teachers and their educators - standards for development : 30th annual conference of the Association for Teacher Education in Europe, Association for Teacher Education in Europe, Amsterdam, Netherlands, pp. 1-11.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Standardising differences? Theorising 'identities' and pedagogical approaches to working with diversity
Author(s) Allard, Andrea
Conference name Association for Teacher Education in Europe. Conference (30th : 2005 : Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Conference location Amsterdam, Netherlands
Conference dates 22-26 October 2005
Title of proceedings ATEE 2005 : Teachers and their educators - standards for development : 30th annual conference of the Association for Teacher Education in Europe
Publication date 2005
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher Association for Teacher Education in Europe
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Summary ‘Race’, socio-economic status, gender and ethnicity are theorised as fluid, dynamic and interconnected categories of identity within post-structural theories. Understanding identities as socio-culturally constructed offers opportunities to think differently about how teachers and teacher education students position themselves and are positioned within these discourses. In Australia, where the teaching profession is overwhelmingly Anglo-Australian (Rizvi 1992; Santoro et al, 2001), mono-lingual and of middle-class background, Australian students are becoming far more linguistically and culturally diverse. Since engagement with teachers who ‘know’ their students, (Delpit, 1995) and the communities from which they come is a major predictor of successful educational outcomes, the growing disparity between teachers’ and students’ cultural and classed experiences is of concern. While teacher education programs focus on developing the attributes in new graduates to work productively with difference, the actualities of doing so are problematic.

This paper reviews some current Australian, North American and United Kingdom approaches to working with student teachers’ constructs of self in terms of ethnicity, ‘race’ and class in order to problematise taken-for-granted ideas of ‘normal’. It considers debates that surface around ‘individuality’ versus ‘collective’ differences; additionally, some of the resistances and dilemmas that emerge when ‘white’, middle class students are asked to rethink their own positionality are examined. Questions regarding what constitutes productive ways to teach inclusive and transformative pedagogies are raised in light of current theory and practice.
Language eng
Field of Research 160809 Sociology of Education
HERDC Research category L1 Full written paper - refereed (minor conferences)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015828

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Scientific and Developmental Studies in Education
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 356 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 12 Nov 2008, 13:08:54 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.