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The Body of Christ : blasphemy, eroticism and transgression in Martin Scorses's The Last Temptation of Christ

D`Cruz, Glenn and D`Cruz, Carolyn 2005, The Body of Christ : blasphemy, eroticism and transgression in Martin Scorses's The Last Temptation of Christ, in Negotiating the sacred II : Blasphemy and Sacrilege in the Arts, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T., pp. 1-1.

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Title The Body of Christ : blasphemy, eroticism and transgression in Martin Scorses's The Last Temptation of Christ
Author(s) D`Cruz, GlennORCID iD for D`Cruz, Glenn orcid.org/0000-0002-6438-1725
D`Cruz, Carolyn
Conference name Blasphemy and Sacrilege in the Arts Conference (2005 : Canberra, A.C.T.)
Conference location Canberra, A.C.T.
Conference dates 3-4 November 2005
Title of proceedings Negotiating the sacred II : Blasphemy and Sacrilege in the Arts
Editor(s) Coleman, Elizabeth
Fernandes Dias, Maria-Suzette
Publication date 2005
Start page 1
End page 1
Publisher Australian National University
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Summary Martin Scorsese’s film The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) has polarised critics and audiences for almost two decades. The film is most often remembered for offending the religious sensibilities of fundamentalist Christians, who objected to Scorsese’s representation of Christ as a neurotic figure who struggles to reconcile his divinity with his sexual impulses.

Even critics who reject the fundamentalist accusations of blasphemy are divided about the film’s value. For example, Rolando Caputo praises the film as an unrecognised masterpiece, which confirms Scorsese’s status as an auteur. Conversely, Leonard W. Levy, dismiss the film as having little artistic merit. This paper re-evaluates the film as a serious theological text by re-examining the film in the light of Michel Foucault’s essay ‘A Preface to Transgression,’ arguing that the film can be read as a sophisticated attempt to examine the connections between corporeality, divinity and human subjectivity.
ISBN 9781921536267
1921536268
Language eng
Field of Research 190201 Cinema Studies
HERDC Research category L1 Full written paper - refereed (minor conferences)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015867

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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