Variation in plasma leptin levels in response to fasting in Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella)

Arnould, John, Morris, M..J., Rawlins, D.R. and Boyd, I.L. 2002, Variation in plasma leptin levels in response to fasting in Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella), Journal of comparative physiology. B, Biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology, vol. 172, no. 1, pp. 27-34.


Title Variation in plasma leptin levels in response to fasting in Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella)
Formatted title Variation in plasma leptin levels in response to fasting in Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella)
Author(s) Arnould, John
Morris, M..J.
Rawlins, D.R.
Boyd, I.L.
Journal name Journal of comparative physiology. B, Biochemical, systemic, and environmental physiology
Volume number 172
Issue number 1
Start page 27
End page 34
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2002-01
ISSN 0174-1578
1432-136X
Keyword(s) pinnipeds
fasting
leptin
triglyceride
cholesterol
Summary Plasma leptin levels were determined in 8 lactating female and 20 pup Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) during fasting periods of normal duration. Plasma leptin levels ranged from 1.35-3.19 ng·ml-1 in lactating females and 1.79-4.80 ng·ml-1 in pups and were not positively correlated with body mass or condition. A negative trend, however, was observed between plasma leptin levels and body condition in lactating females upon their arrival at the colony following a foraging trip (beginning of fast). In accordance with findings in other species, plasma leptin levels dropped significantly (P<0.02) in response to the 17-19% drop in body mass experienced by pups during fasting. In contrast, plasma leptin levels in lactating females increased during the first 24 h of fasting before decreasing throughout the remaining 48 h of the fast. This unexpected result could be due to the high level of energy expenditure by seals as they swim back to the colony (i.e. post-exercise response) or may be influenced by the intense suckling activity experienced by females during the onshore fasting periods. The results of this study support recent findings in other carnivore species which suggest the primary physiological role of leptin in these species may not necessarily be as a signal of the magnitude of body energy reserves.
Language eng
Field of Research 060602 Animal Physiology - Cell
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Springer-Verlag
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015948

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 15 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 448 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 17 Dec 2008, 12:41:31 EST by Gabrielle Lamb

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.