Openly accessible

A development of environmental conscious design of prison buildings

Al-Hosany, N. and Elkadi, Hisham 2004, A development of environmental conscious design of prison buildings, in CIB World Building Congress 2004 [building for the future : in conjunction with the 5th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Energy Conservation in Buildings and the 6th International Conference on Multipurpose High-rise Towers and Tall Buildings : proceedings : Toronto, Canada, 1-7 May, 2004], Institute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, Ont..

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
elkadi-developmentofenvironmental-2004.pdf Published version application/pdf 649.97KB 510

Title A development of environmental conscious design of prison buildings
Author(s) Al-Hosany, N.
Elkadi, Hisham
Conference name CIB World Building Congress (5th : 2004 : Toronto, Canada)
Conference location Toronto, Canada
Conference dates 1-7 May 2004
Title of proceedings CIB World Building Congress 2004 [building for the future : in conjunction with the 5th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Energy Conservation in Buildings and the 6th International Conference on Multipurpose High-rise Towers and Tall Buildings : proceedings : Toronto, Canada, 1-7 May, 2004]
Editor(s) Vanier, Dana
Publication date 2004
Publisher Institute for Research in Construction
Place of publication Ottawa, Ont.
Summary Environmental conscious design refers to variety of approaches in architecture design that covers technical, behavioural, and functional aspects (Goulding et al, 1992). These approaches usually include contradictory measures with social indicators (Sykes, 1995; Norton, 1999). The contradiction is magnified in incarceration architecture, which is very specific type of buildings (McConville, 2000). Prison buildings represent the split between the society requirements and the needs for the users, in this case the prisoners, to have comfortable environment. Energy as an ultimate natural resource reflects both the cost to the society, in terms of cooling/ heating load and the need for comfort and rehabilitation of prisoners (Al-Hosany and Elkadi, 2000). Different energy codes tend to control the thermal behaviour of buildings in certain environment in order to maximise their energy efficiency (e.g. CIBSE, 1999). In prison buildings, some of the main variables of such code are not relevant. While energy codes, for example, regulate the use of glass in buildings by either minimise the openings size (prescriptive criteria) or by determine an overall limit of heat transfer (performance criteria), the objective in prison buildings is to minimise glass areas for security purposes. This leads in turn to reduction in visual and comfort levels in prison cells. The aim of this paper is to address the balance between the society requirements of reducing energy consumption in prison buildings and the need for humane and comfortable environment for prisoners in order to maintain sustainability. The paper investigates the possible role of façade technologies to bridge the gap between requirements of both society and prisoners.

Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 0662367162
9780662367161
Language eng
Field of Research 120101 Architectural Design
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30016536

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 555 Abstract Views, 510 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 24 Jun 2009, 11:42:09 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.