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Child labour and supply chain : profitability or (mis)management

Zutshi, Ambika, Creed, Andrew and Sohal, Amrik 2009, Child labour and supply chain : profitability or (mis)management, European business review, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 42-63.

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Title Child labour and supply chain : profitability or (mis)management
Author(s) Zutshi, Ambika
Creed, Andrew
Sohal, Amrik
Journal name European business review
Volume number 21
Issue number 1
Start page 42
End page 63
Total pages 22
Publisher MCB University Press
Place of publication Braford, England
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0955-534X
1758-7107
Keyword(s) corporate social responsibility
supply chain management
global ulilization
children (age groups)
globalization
Summary Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a realistic assessment, with an historical perspective, of the current practises and progress made by organisations towards elimination of child labour in global supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach – Literature review in the area of use of child labour within the global supply chain was combined with additional information obtained from the company searches of the GRI database, company ranking tables, and other sources.

Findings – Child labour is one of a number of areas of concern in global supply chains. Continued exploitation of child labour indicates an imbalanced state and consequently forces can be unleashed through standardization, collaboration and communication amongst all stakeholders to ensure protection of the vulnerable. This paper is part of the broader analysis informing incremental changes to supply chain management to preserve the rights and welfare of children in the present and future generations. Research/limitations/implications – The analysis is based on secondary data sources and further research is thus needed to verify the individual weightings of the criteria used in the primary ranking of the companies.

Practical implications – The findings provide encouragement for policy and decision makers to implement incremental changes to global supply chains in order to protect the rights and welfare of children, according to the standards of Social Accountability (SA) 8000, the International Labour Organisation (ILO), and other world trade stakeholders.

Originality/value – This paper questions the view that child labour incidences have diminished proportional to economic development. A swinging fulcrum with hidden traps for developed and developing nations in light of cross border transactions through supply chains has been proposed.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 150305 Human Resources Management
Socio Economic Objective 910402 Management
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Emerald Group Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30016663

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.