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Intervention programmes to recruit female computing students : why do the programme champions do it?

Craig, Annemieke 2009, Intervention programmes to recruit female computing students : why do the programme champions do it?, in ACE 2009 : Proceedings of the eleventh Australasian computing education conference (ACE 2009), Australian Computer Society, Sydney South, N.S.W., pp. 35-44.

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Title Intervention programmes to recruit female computing students : why do the programme champions do it?
Author(s) Craig, Annemieke
Conference name Australasian Computing Education Conference (11th : 2009 : Wellington, New Zealand)
Conference location Wellington, New Zealand
Conference dates 19-23 January 2009
Title of proceedings ACE 2009 : Proceedings of the eleventh Australasian computing education conference (ACE 2009)
Editor(s) Hamilton, Margaret
Clear, Tony
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australasian Computing Education Conference
Start page 35
End page 44
Total pages 10
Publisher Australian Computer Society
Place of publication Sydney South, N.S.W.
Keyword(s) recruitment
computing students
female
Summary This paper looks at intervention programmes to improve the representation of female students in computing education and the computer industry, A multiple case study methodology was used to look at major intervention programmes conducted in Australia. One aspect of the research focused on the programme champions; those women from the computing industry, those working within government organisations and those in academia who instigated the programmes. The success of these intervention programmes appears to have been highly dependent upon not only the design of the programme but on the involvement of these strong individuals who were passionate and worked tirelessly to ensure the programme's success. This paper provides an opportunity for the voices of these women to be heard. It describes the champions' own initial involvement with computing which frequently motivated and inspired them to conduct such programmes. The research found that when these types of intervention programmes were conducted by academic staff the work was undervalued compared to when the activities were conducted by staff in industry or in government. The academic environment was often not supportive of academics who conducted intervention programmes for female students.
ISBN 9781920682767
ISSN 1445-1336
Language eng
Field of Research 200205 Culture, Gender, Sexuality
Socio Economic Objective 939904 Gender Aspects of Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2009, Australian Computer Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30016667

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.