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Informing decision-making in libraries: informetric research as input to LIS education and practice.(Library and Information Science).

Davis, Mari, Wilson, Concepcion S. and Horn, Anne 2005, Informing decision-making in libraries: informetric research as input to LIS education and practice.(Library and Information Science)., Australian academic and research libraries, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 195-214.

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Title Informing decision-making in libraries: informetric research as input to LIS education and practice.(Library and Information Science).
Alternative title Informetric research as input to LIS education and practice: Application of informetric data to inform decision-making in libraries
Author(s) Davis, Mari
Wilson, Concepcion S.
Horn, Anne
Journal name Australian academic and research libraries
Volume number 36
Issue number 4
Start page 195
End page 214
Total pages 19
Publisher University & College Libraries Section of the Library Association of Australia
Place of publication Bundoora, Vic.
Publication date 2005-12
ISSN 0004-8623
Summary Findings from informetric research represent an important background resource to add to the mix of information useful for resolving difficult and ongoing problems in specific library environments or information service settings. This paper provides examples of informetric research that can be useful input to decision-making in the field of library management and information service provision. This overview takes four of the challenges that Michael Buckland outlined for library research as a way of guiding the discussion of ways that informetric work can be used to inform library decision-making. (1) References are made to relevant informetric work undertaken or conducted in Australia, by Australian researchers, or with Australian data.

Informetrics includes both quantitative and qualitative methods, which when used in combination can provide a rounded set of findings that has great validity for management, policy and service applications. Quantitative methodologies are generally based on bibliometric techniques, such as mining and analysis of data from various bibliographic and textual databases. Qualitative methods include survey, case study and historical approaches. Used in combination, each set of findings adds richness and other perspectives to an analysis.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 080705 Informetrics
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2005, Australian Library and Information Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30016675

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Library
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.