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Using organizational justice to predict in-role and extra-role performance works in different ways for men relative to women

Jepsen, Denise M. and Rodwell, John J. 2007, Using organizational justice to predict in-role and extra-role performance works in different ways for men relative to women, in ANZAM 2007 : Managing our intellectual and social capital, Promaco Conventions, Canning Bridge, W.A., pp. 1-17.

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Title Using organizational justice to predict in-role and extra-role performance works in different ways for men relative to women
Alternative title Organizational justice predicts in-role and extra-role performance differently for men and women
Author(s) Jepsen, Denise M.
Rodwell, John J.
Conference name Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference (21st : 2007 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 4-7 December 2007
Title of proceedings ANZAM 2007 : Managing our intellectual and social capital
Editor(s) Chapman, Ross
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Promaco Conventions
Place of publication Canning Bridge, W.A.
Keyword(s) work performance
attitudes
job & work design
Summary Distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational justices were included in this study of gender differences in in-role and extra-role behavior. Distributive justice predicted performance, organizational commitment and OCB for men but only performance and job satisfaction for women. Procedural justice predicted job satisfaction for men and did not predict any outcomes for women. Informational justice predicted job satisfaction for both male and female respondents. Informational justice predicted female but not male organizational commitment and in-role performance. Interpersonal justice predicted male but not female organizational citizenship behavior. The study demonstrates important distinctions between the four organizational justice types and how men and women respond differently to those distinctions. The differences in the drivers of in-role performance between men and women may also have practical implications for managers. For example, distributive justice was a direct in-role performance driver for both genders, but informational justice provides an incremental direct effect for women.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 1863081402
9781863081405
Language eng
Field of Research 150305 Human Resources Management
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2007, ANZAM
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30016762

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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