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Al-Jazeera : a broadcaster creating ripples in a stagnant pool

Quinn, Stephen and Walters, Tim 2004, Al-Jazeera : a broadcaster creating ripples in a stagnant pool, Australian journalism review, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 53-69.

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Title Al-Jazeera : a broadcaster creating ripples in a stagnant pool
Author(s) Quinn, Stephen
Walters, Tim
Journal name Australian journalism review
Volume number 25
Issue number 1
Start page 53
End page 69
Publisher Journalism Education Association
Place of publication St Lucia, Qld.
Publication date 2004-07
ISSN 0810-2686
Summary Al-Jazeera is unique in the Arab world. In an environment of state-controlled or stale media, this Arab-language news channel sees itself as a source of fresh water in a parched region bereft of freedom of expression. It broadcasts controversial subjects and, in doing so, has attracted an audience of 35 million households - and plenty of criticism. Most notable controversies have been the airing of tapes of Osama bin Laden. and the broadcasting of images of captured Coalition soldiers and bloodied corpses during the Iraq war. Before those events, Al-Jazeera had criticised Arab heads of state, blatantly ignoring the Arab States Broadcasting Union's code of honour. Some companies have avoided the channel because advertising in the Middle East is based on political, not commercial, interests. Yet along the way, AI-Jazeera has put Qatar. a tiny Gulf nation of perhaps 600,000 people, on the world map. Based on the last-known interviews before the station went on a war footing, this paper looks at why and how AI-Jazeera does what it does. Among the things covered are how the station defines freedom of expression through its own eyes. the role that the station and its employees believe they are serving in the marketplace. and why they do what they do. The paper also considers the station s role in the war in Iraq in March and April of 2003.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 190301 Journalism Studies
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Journalism Education Association
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30016817

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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