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No effect of n - 3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (EPA and DHA) supplementation on depressed mood and cognitive function : a randomised controlled trial

Rogers, Peter, Appleton, Katherine, Kessler, David, Peters, Tim, Gunnell, David, Hayward, Robert, Heatherley, Susan, Christian, Leonie, McNaughton, Sarah and Ness, Andy 2008, No effect of n - 3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (EPA and DHA) supplementation on depressed mood and cognitive function : a randomised controlled trial, The British journal of nutrition, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 421-431.

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Title No effect of n - 3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (EPA and DHA) supplementation on depressed mood and cognitive function : a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Rogers, Peter
Appleton, Katherine
Kessler, David
Peters, Tim
Gunnell, David
Hayward, Robert
Heatherley, Susan
Christian, Leonie
McNaughton, Sarah
Ness, Andy
Journal name The British journal of nutrition
Volume number 99
Issue number 2
Start page 421
End page 431
Total pages 11
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2008-02
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) depressed mood
cognitive function
EPA
DHA
Summary Low dietary intakes of the n-3 long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) EPA and DHA are thought to be associated with increased risk for a variety of adverse  outcomes, including some psychiatric disorders. Evidence from  observational and intervention studies for a role of n-3 LCPUFA in depression is mixed, with some support for a benefit of EPA and/or DHA in major depressive illness. The present study was a double-blind randomised controlled trial that evaluated the effects of EPA+DHA supplementation (1.5 g/d) on mood and cognitive function in mild to moderately depressed  individuals. Of 218 participants who entered the trial, 190 completed the planned 12 weeks intervention. Compliance, confirmed by plasma fatty acid concentrations, was good, but there was no evidence of a difference between supplemented and placebo groups in the primary outcome - namely, the depression subscale of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales at 12 weeks. Mean depression score was 8.4 for the EPA+DHA group and 9.6 for the placebo group, with an adjusted difference of - 1.0 (95 % CI - 2.8, 0.8; P = 0.27). Other measures of mood, mental health and cognitive function, including Beck Depression Inventory score and attentional bias toward threat words, were similarly little affected by the intervention. In conclusion, substantially increasing EPA+DHA intake for 3 months was found not to have beneficial or harmful effects on mood in mild to moderate depression. Adding the present result to a meta-analysis of previous relevant randomised controlled trial results confirmed an overall negligible benefit of n-3 LCPUFA supplementation for depressed mood.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017070

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