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Rethinking policies for the retention of allied health professionals in rural areas : a social relations approach

O'Toole, Kevin, Schoo, Adrian, Stagnitti, Karen and Cuss, Kate 2008, Rethinking policies for the retention of allied health professionals in rural areas : a social relations approach, Health Policy, vol. 87, no. 3, pp. 326-332, doi: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2008.01.012.

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Title Rethinking policies for the retention of allied health professionals in rural areas : a social relations approach
Author(s) O'Toole, Kevin
Schoo, Adrian
Stagnitti, KarenORCID iD for Stagnitti, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-6215-3390
Cuss, Kate
Journal name Health Policy
Volume number 87
Issue number 3
Start page 326
End page 332
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Place of publication Clare, Ireland
Publication date 2008-09
ISSN 0168-8510
1872-6054
Keyword(s) rural policy
policy development
social relations
allied health professionals
Summary Objective: Retaining allied health professionals in rural areas is a recognised problem. Generally the literature has concentrated on three elements: practitioner needs, community needs and organisational needs. There has been little attempt to focus other types of social relations in which health practitioner retention and recruitment takes place. The aim of this paper is to question the present dominant hierarchical approach taken in relation to the retention of allied health professionals in rural localities.

Methods: The data derives from a survey in Southwest Victoria, Australia. The sample was purposive rather than representative as it was intended to be exploratory in nature rather than definitive.

Results
: The data indicates that there is a greater tendency for allied health professionals in private practice to be retained in rural areas than those in the public sector.

Conclusion
: The paper concludes by raising some questions about the pertinence of present models for regional health initiatives since they are locked into a bureuacratic model where relationships are hierarchical and asymmetrically controlled.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2008.01.012
Field of Research 160510 Public Policy
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017149

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of International and Political Studies
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