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Investigative interviewers' perceptions of the value of different training Tasks on their adherence to open-ended questions with children

Powell, Martine B. and Wright, Rebecca 2008, Investigative interviewers' perceptions of the value of different training Tasks on their adherence to open-ended questions with children, Psychiatry, psychology, and law : an interdisciplinary journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 272-283, doi: 10.1080/13218710802014493.

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Title Investigative interviewers' perceptions of the value of different training Tasks on their adherence to open-ended questions with children
Author(s) Powell, Martine B.ORCID iD for Powell, Martine B. orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Wright, Rebecca
Journal name Psychiatry, psychology, and law : an interdisciplinary journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Start page 272
End page 283
Total pages 12
Publisher Australian Academic Press
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Publication date 2008-07
ISSN 1321-8719
1934-1687
Keyword(s) child abuse investigation
investigative interviewing
police training
Summary Prior research has highlighted the considerable difficulties investigative interviewers have in adhering to open-ended questions in child abuse interviews. Although improvements in interviewing can be achieved by providing training that incorporates multiple practice opportunities and feedback, currently little is known about the way in which these elements are best administered. The current study extends debate and research on this issue by examining the perceptions of 15 trainee interviewers (police as well as social workers) regarding the relative value of various practical training exercises experienced in a recent training program. The findings indicated that although practice in interviewing was deemed essential, not all tasks were perceived to be equally beneficial. The two most favoured exercises were (a) simulated interviews involving trained actors playing the role of the child, and (b) self-evaluation of a transcribed interview using an objective coding protocol. A summary of the participants' perceptions is provided along with a discussion of the implications for trainers and researchers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13218710802014493
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Australian Academic Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017160

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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