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Learning style drift : correlation between built environment students' learning styles and the learning styles of their teachers

Tucker, Richard 2008, Learning style drift : correlation between built environment students' learning styles and the learning styles of their teachers, Journal for education in the built environment, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 68-79.

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Title Learning style drift : correlation between built environment students' learning styles and the learning styles of their teachers
Author(s) Tucker, Richard
Journal name Journal for education in the built environment
Volume number 3
Issue number 1
Start page 68
End page 79
Total pages 12
Publisher Centre for Education in the Built Environment
Place of publication Cardiff, Wales
Publication date 2008-07
ISSN 1747-4205
Keyword(s) learning styles
studio
pedagogy
teaching styles
architectural education
construction management
Summary This paper focuses on the results of a cross-curriculum learning style survey conducted in an Australian School of Architecture and Building as part of an ongoing project aimed at resolving the learning difficulties of students collaborating in multi-disciplinary and multicultural team assignments. The research was conducted to determine how learning style differences in heterogeneous design teams might be addressed through pedagogy. We will argue that the likelihood of and reasons for learning style fluidity in student design cohorts needs determining if learning style theory is to provide a workable model for informing the teaching of design.
In light of evidence in student cohorts of learning style changes as students progress through their studies (Tucker, 2007), this research discusses one explanation of what appears to belearning style fluidity in architecture student cohorts. If, as prior research has indicated, the learning styles of academics are quite different from practitioners, evidence of a learning style drift in built environment students towards the predominant learning styles of their design teachers might suggest that students are learning how to be academics rather than practitioners. This, of course, might have serious implications for built environment teaching and for practice.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 130303 Education Assessment and Evaluation
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Centre for Eduction in the Built Environment
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017207

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