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Can oiled shorebirds and their nests and eggs be successfully rehabilitated? A case study involving the threatened Hooded plover Thinornis rubricollis in South-eastern Australia

Weston, Michael A., Dann, Peter, Jessop, Ross, Fallaw, Jon, Dakin, Richard and Ball, David 2008, Can oiled shorebirds and their nests and eggs be successfully rehabilitated? A case study involving the threatened Hooded plover Thinornis rubricollis in South-eastern Australia, Waterbirds, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 127-132, doi: 10.1675/1524-4695(2008)31[127:COSATN]2.0.CO;2.

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Title Can oiled shorebirds and their nests and eggs be successfully rehabilitated? A case study involving the threatened Hooded plover Thinornis rubricollis in South-eastern Australia
Formatted title Can oiled shorebirds and their nests and eggs be successfully rehabilitated? A case study involving the threatened Hooded plover Thinornis rubricollis in South-eastern Australia
Author(s) Weston, Michael A.ORCID iD for Weston, Michael A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Dann, Peter
Jessop, Ross
Fallaw, Jon
Dakin, Richard
Ball, David
Journal name Waterbirds
Volume number 31
Issue number 1
Start page 127
End page 132
Total pages 6
Publisher Waterbird Society
Place of publication Waco, Tex.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1524-4695
1938-5390
Keyword(s) oil
rescue
rehabilitation
shorebirds
capture
cleaning
release
Summary Although shorebirds are detrimentally affected by marine oil spills, they are often overlooked during rescue and rehabilitation efforts. This note describes a rescue and successful rehabilitation effort of an oiled adult and a juvenile Hooded Plover (Thinornis rubricollis) in Victoria, south-eastern Australia, during an oil-spill which oiled almost 1% of the State’s population of this threatened beach-nesting species. Two birds requiring intervention were located, selectively captured, cleaned and released. Both have survived at least two years after the spill and have bred, with at least one successfully fledging young. The fledgling has also successfully bred. Two nests with eggs present during clean-up operations were protected and hatched successfully. This small case study indicates that at least some groups of breeding shorebirds, such as plovers and dotterels, can be effectively rescued and rehabilitated during oil spills, and hence should not be overlooked during such circumstances.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1675/1524-4695(2008)31[127:COSATN]2.0.CO;2
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, BioOne
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017273

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.