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Spatial and temporal variation in the breeding of Masked Lapwings (Vanellus miles) in Australia

Chambers, Lynda E., Gibbs, Heather, Weston, Michael A. and Ehmke, Glenn C. 2008, Spatial and temporal variation in the breeding of Masked Lapwings (Vanellus miles) in Australia, Emu, vol. 108, no. 2, pp. 115-124, doi: 10.1071/MU07064.

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Title Spatial and temporal variation in the breeding of Masked Lapwings (Vanellus miles) in Australia
Formatted title Spatial and temporal variation in the breeding of Masked Lapwings (Vanellus miles) in Australia
Author(s) Chambers, Lynda E.
Gibbs, Heather
Weston, Michael A.ORCID iD for Weston, Michael A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Ehmke, Glenn C.
Journal name Emu
Volume number 108
Issue number 2
Start page 115
End page 124
Total pages 10
Publisher CSIRO
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2008-05-01
ISSN 0158-4197
1448-5540
Summary Spatial and temporal variation in the breeding of Masked Lapwings (Vanellus miles) in Australia were examined using data from Birds Australia’s Nest Record Scheme (NRS; 1957–2002), the Atlas of Australian Birds (1998–2006), and climatic data (1952–2006). Breeding in north-western Australia was concentrated in summer, while in other regions the peak of breeding occurred during spring. Breeding success varied between regions and years but was generally highest in Tasmania. Clutch-size (mean 3.57 eggs ± 0.033 s.e., n = 549 clutches) did not vary regionally or temporally. In the north-east, breeding became earlier over time (~1.9 days per year, NRS), while in the south-east, breeding became later (~0.9 days per year); in other regions temporal trends were not evident. Only Tasmania showed a significant temporal change in breeding success (decrease of ~1.5% per year). All regions experienced warming climates, and annual rainfall increased in north-western regions and decreased in eastern regions. There were weak or no relationships between the amount or success of breeding, clutch-size and the climatic variables considered (with the possible exception of Tasmania), suggesting either that data limitations precluded us from detecting subtle effects or that Masked Lapwings have been little influenced or are resilient to changes in climate over most of their range.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/MU07064
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017318

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