Negative beliefs about low back pain are associated with high pain intensity and high level disability in community-based women

Urquhart, Donna M., Bell, Robin J., Cicuttini, Flavia M., Cui, Jisheng, Forbes, Andrew and Davis, Susan R. 2008, Negative beliefs about low back pain are associated with high pain intensity and high level disability in community-based women, BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, vol. 9, pp. 1-8.


Title Negative beliefs about low back pain are associated with high pain intensity and high level disability in community-based women
Author(s) Urquhart, Donna M.
Bell, Robin J.
Cicuttini, Flavia M.
Cui, Jisheng
Forbes, Andrew
Davis, Susan R.
Journal name BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume number 9
Start page 1
End page 8
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2008-11-04
ISSN 1471-2474
Summary Background Although previous studies have investigated beliefs about back pain in clinical and employed populations, there is a paucity of data examining the beliefs of the broader community. We aimed to characterize the beliefs that community-dwelling women have about back pain and its consequences, and to determine whether those with varying levels of pain intensity and disability differ in their beliefs. Methods 542 community-dwelling women, aged 24 to 80 years, were recruited from a research database. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that included detailed demographic information, the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire (CPG) and the Back Beliefs Questionnaire (BBQ). The CPG examined individuals' levels of pain intensity and disability, and the BBQ investigated their beliefs about back pain and its consequences. Results 506 (93.4%) women returned the study questionnaire. The mean (SD) BBQ score for the cohort was 30.7 (6.0), indicating generally positive beliefs about back pain. However, those women with high intensity pain and high level disability had a mean (SD) score of 28.5 (5.7) and 24.8 (5.7) respectively, which reflects greater negativity about back pain and its consequences. There was an association between negative beliefs and high pain intensity (OR = 0.94 (95% CI: 0.90, 0.99), p = 0.01) and high level disability (OR = 0.93 (95% CI: 0.89, 0.97), p = 0.001), after adjusting for confounders. Conclusion This study highlights that although women living in the community were generally positive about back pain, subgroups of women with high pain intensity and high level disability were identified who had more pessimistic views. While a causal relationship cannot be inferred from these cross-sectional data, the results suggest that negative beliefs individuals have about back pain may be predictive of chronic, disabling spinal pain.
Language eng
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017340

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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