A culturally appropriate diet and lifestyle intervention can successfully treat the components of metabolic syndrome in female Pakistani immigrants residing in Melbourne, Australia

Kousar, Rizwana, Burns, Cate and Lewandowski, Paul 2008, A culturally appropriate diet and lifestyle intervention can successfully treat the components of metabolic syndrome in female Pakistani immigrants residing in Melbourne, Australia, Metabolism : clinical and experimental, vol. 57, no. 11, pp. 1502-1508.

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Title A culturally appropriate diet and lifestyle intervention can successfully treat the components of metabolic syndrome in female Pakistani immigrants residing in Melbourne, Australia
Author(s) Kousar, Rizwana
Burns, Cate
Lewandowski, Paul
Journal name Metabolism : clinical and experimental
Volume number 57
Issue number 11
Start page 1502
End page 1508
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2008-11
ISSN 0026-0495
1532-8600
Summary This study was designed to test the effectiveness of a culturally appropriate diet and lifestyle intervention to treat metabolic syndrome in female Pakistani immigrants residing in Melbourne, Australia. Forty Pakistani women with metabolic syndrome (aged 20-50 years) completed a 12-week culturally appropriate diet and exercise program. Results indicate that, before intervention, participants were sedentary, taking 4000 ± 22.6 steps per day, and had an obese-classified body mass index (BMI) of 29.2 ± 0.46 kg/m2 (BMI was categorized in accordance with guidelines specifically designed for Asians) and high waist circumference of 132 ± 25.95 cm. Participants were hypertensive (systolic, 135 ± 1.3 mm Hg; diastolic, 86 ± 0.68 mm Hg), were dyslipidemic (total cholesterol, 6.8 ± 0.15 mmol/L; triglycerides, 2.9 ± 0.09 mmol/L), and had elevated blood glucose (6.4 ± 0.33 mmol/L) and fasting blood insulin (45 ± 6.3 μU/mL) levels. After the 12-week culturally appropriate intervention, activity increased (8600 ± 596.7 steps per day, P < .05); and BMI (27.8 ± 0.45 kg/m2), blood pressure (systolic, 125 ± 1.4 mm Hg; diastolic, 80 ± 0.6 mm Hg), cholesterol (5.5 ± 0.1 mmol/L), blood glucose (5.9 ± 0.33 mmol/L), and blood insulin (24.14 ± 1.8 μU/mL) levels were all significantly reduced (P < .05). This study revealed that the Pakistani female migrants who had metabolic syndrome and its components can successfully be treated via a culturally appropriate diet and lifestyle intervention. The success of the current program raises the possibility that other high-risk ethnic groups can also be treated with a culturally appropriate program.
Language eng
Field of Research 110306 Endocrinology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Elsevier Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017344

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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