Is a healthy diet affordable and accessible in the city of Yarra, Victoria Australia? An analysis of cost disparity and nutritional choices

Renzaho, Andre 2008, Is a healthy diet affordable and accessible in the city of Yarra, Victoria Australia? An analysis of cost disparity and nutritional choices, Ecology of food and nutrition, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 44-63.

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Title Is a healthy diet affordable and accessible in the city of Yarra, Victoria Australia? An analysis of cost disparity and nutritional choices
Author(s) Renzaho, Andre
Journal name Ecology of food and nutrition
Volume number 47
Issue number 1
Start page 44
End page 63
Publisher Taylor & Francis Inc.
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2008-01
ISSN 0367-0244
1543-5237
Keyword(s) food access
food availability
healthy eating
food basket
cost; city of Yarra
Summary This study aimed to examine cost disparity and nutritional choices within the
City of Yarra (Yarra), targeting three suburbs that have low- and high-rise
estates: Richmond, Fitzroy, and Collingwood. The healthy food basket
(HFB) was modeled on the Queensland Healthy Food Access Basket for a
six-person family for a fortnight and was constructed to include food items
that are common to ethnic groups living in Yarra. The HFB food item costs
were sampled across 29 food outlets in Yarra. The average cost of HFB per fortnight
for a family of six was significantly lower in Richmond (Mean = $419.26)
than in Collingwood (Mean = $519.28) and in Fitzroy (Mean = $433.98). While
costs for cereal groups, dairy, meats and alternatives, and non-core were
comparable across the suburbs, significant differences were noticed for fruit,
legumes and vegetables. Geographic location alone explained 54% of the
variance in HFB price (F2,26 = 15.23, p < 0.001) and 32.7% in the variance of
fruit, vegetable and legumes (F2,26 = 7.72, p < 0.001). The effect of geographic
location remained consistent after controlling for the type of food
outlets. The type of food outlets had a non-significant effect on the variance
of prices. Richmond had a greater number variety of fruit, vegetables, and
legumes (F2, 26 = 5.7, p < 0.01) and an overall lower number of missing items
(F2, 26 = 3.9, p < 0.05) than Collingwood and Fitzroy. The diversity of food
available in the three suburbs was more likely to reflect the Vietnamese,
Chinese and East-Timorese shopping pattern than the rest of other ethnic
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ┬ęTaylor & Francis Group, LLC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017348

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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