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Pretend play, social competence and involvement in children aged 5-7 years : the concurrent validity of the child-initiated pretend play assessment

Uren, Nicole and Stagnitti, Karen 2009, Pretend play, social competence and involvement in children aged 5-7 years : the concurrent validity of the child-initiated pretend play assessment, Australian occupational therapy journal, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 33-40, doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1630.2008.00761.x.

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Title Pretend play, social competence and involvement in children aged 5-7 years : the concurrent validity of the child-initiated pretend play assessment
Author(s) Uren, Nicole
Stagnitti, KarenORCID iD for Stagnitti, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-6215-3390
Journal name Australian occupational therapy journal
Volume number 56
Issue number 1
Start page 33
End page 40
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Subiaco, W.A.
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 0045-0766
1440-1630
Keyword(s) concurrent validity
learning
pretend play
social competence
Summary Background and aims: The aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between pretend play, social competence and involvement in school-based activities in children aged 5–7 years and to determine whether children's social competence and level of involvement could be inferred from their scores on the Child-Initiated Pretend Play Assessment.
Procedure: The pretend play skills of 41 primary school-aged children aged 5–7 years were assessed on a one-on-one basis. Classroom teachers of the children assessed the children's social competence using the Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale and their involvement in school based activities using the Leuven Involvement Scale for Young Children.
Main findings: Significant positive relationships were found between elaborate pretend play and object substitution scores, involvement scores and peer play interaction scores (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). A significant negative relationship was found between elaborate pretend play scores, and social disconnection and social disruption scores (P < 0.05). Play deficit indicators were significantly negatively related to involvement scores (P < 0.01). This suggests that children with proficient pretend play skills are socially competent with peers and are able to engage in classroom activity. Children who scored poorly on the play assessment were more likely to have difficulty interacting with their peers and engaging in school activities.
Conclusion: Social competence and involvement skills are related to a child's ability to engage in pretend play. A child's social skills and ability to engage in school activities as assessed by teachers can be inferred from their scores on the Child-Initiated Pretend Play Assessment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1630.2008.00761.x
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Australian Association of Occupational Therapists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017396

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Fri, 14 Aug 2009, 13:52:53 EST

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