University students' perceptions of the alcohol campaign : "Is Getting Pissed Getting Pathetic? (Just Ask Your Friends)"

Ricciardelli, L. and McCabe, M. 2008, University students' perceptions of the alcohol campaign : "Is Getting Pissed Getting Pathetic? (Just Ask Your Friends)", Addictive Behaviors, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 366-372.

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Title University students' perceptions of the alcohol campaign : "Is Getting Pissed Getting Pathetic? (Just Ask Your Friends)"
Author(s) Ricciardelli, L.
McCabe, M.
Journal name Addictive Behaviors
Volume number 33
Issue number 2
Start page 366
End page 372
Total pages 7
Publisher Pergamon
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publication date 2008-02
ISSN 0306-4603
1873-6327
Summary The present study examined students' understanding and perceived effectiveness of a recent Australian alcohol campaign designed to increase students' awareness of excessive and harmful drinking. Six hundred and seventy one university students (51% females), who had seen the campaign posters, with the tagline "Is Getting Pissed Getting Pathetic? (Just Ask You Friends)", were asked to comment on the messages that the campaign was communicating and how informative, relevant, and effective they perceived the campaign. Many students were positive in their evaluations and described the messages as "truth and realistic", "clear and to the point", and that the campaign made them think about their own drinking. However, other views were more negative and indicative of psychological reactance. These included concerns that students "won't listen" or "don't care" about media campaigns, and that "they don't what to be told what to do". The findings highlight how media campaigns can help an audience contemplate behavioral change, however, they can also alienate students and promote counterproductive attitudes.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017403

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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