Child protection, risk assessment and blame ideology

Gillingham, Philip and Bromfield, Leah 2008, Child protection, risk assessment and blame ideology, Children Australia, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 18-24.

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Title Child protection, risk assessment and blame ideology
Author(s) Gillingham, Philip
Bromfield, Leah
Journal name Children Australia
Volume number 33
Issue number 1
Start page 18
End page 24
Publisher Oz Child - Children Australia
Place of publication Notting Hill, Vic.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1035-0772
Summary In this article we use qualitative data drawn from a sample of child protection cases 10 demonstrate holV the process of al1ributing blame to parents and carers for child maltreatment is a sign!ficanr influence 011 decisionmaking,
sometimes to the detriment of assessing the flltllre safety of children. We foctls on two cases which both demonstrate how the process of apportioning blame can lead to decisions which might not be considered 10 be in the best interests of the children concerned. We conceptualise blame as an 'ideology' with its roots in the discourse of the 'risk society', pelpetuated and sustained by the technology of risk assessment. The concept of blame ideology is offered as an addition to theOlY which seeks 10 explain the influences on decision making in child protection practice.
Language eng
Field of Research 160701 Clinical Social Work Practice
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017409

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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