You are not logged in.

Where exactly do ground-foraging woodland birds forage? Foraging sites and microhabitat selection in temperate woodlands of southern Australia

Antos, Mark J., Bennett, Andrew F. and White, John G. 2008, Where exactly do ground-foraging woodland birds forage? Foraging sites and microhabitat selection in temperate woodlands of southern Australia, Emu, vol. 108, no. 3, pp. 201-211, doi: 10.1071/MU08005.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Where exactly do ground-foraging woodland birds forage? Foraging sites and microhabitat selection in temperate woodlands of southern Australia
Author(s) Antos, Mark J.
Bennett, Andrew F.
White, John G.ORCID iD for White, John G. orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Journal name Emu
Volume number 108
Issue number 3
Start page 201
End page 211
Total pages 11
Publisher CSIRO
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2008-08-08
ISSN 0158-4197
1448-5540
Summary Bird assemblages in woodlands of southern Australia are characterised by a high proportion of ground-foraging species, many of which are experiencing population declines. We examined the foraging sites of 13 species of ground-foraging birds, including four common species and nine declining species, in four study areas representing different woodland types. Microhabitat features were recorded within a 3-m radius of observed foraging points and compared with random points. Significant differences between foraging and random plots were detected for all but one species, clearly indicating selection for foraging habitat. However, levels of dissimilarity between foraging and random plots were low, suggesting that much of the woodland study area is suitable for foraging. Microhabitat features of particular importance for multiple species were a low density of trees and shrubs, a high cover of native herbs, and fallen timber on the ground. Sites amidst dense trees tended not to be used. Several species had more particular requirements, such as the Diamond Firetail (Stagonopleura guttata) for grass cover and the White-winged Chough (Corcorax melanorhamphos) for litter cover. There was no evidence that declining species showed a greater degree of selection or were more restricted in the availability of foraging microhabitats than common species. Several of the key attributes of preferred foraging sites, such as tree density, can be actively managed at the local scale. A heterogeneous ground layer is needed to provide suitable foraging habitat for the full suite of ground-foraging birds. Achieving suitable heterogeneity in present-day woodlands will require careful and active management of various disturbance processes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/MU08005
Field of Research 050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017436

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 22 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 563 Abstract Views, 5 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 14 Aug 2009, 13:53:18 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.