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Exploring general practitioners' experience of informing women about prenetal screening tests for foetal abnomalities : a qualitative focus group study

Nagle, Cate, Meiser, Bettina, Gunn, Jane, Halliday, Jane, Bell, Robin and Lewis, Sharon 2008, Exploring general practitioners' experience of informing women about prenetal screening tests for foetal abnomalities : a qualitative focus group study, BMC health services research, vol. 8, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-8-114.

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Title Exploring general practitioners' experience of informing women about prenetal screening tests for foetal abnomalities : a qualitative focus group study
Author(s) Nagle, CateORCID iD for Nagle, Cate orcid.org/0000-0002-5661-6379
Meiser, Bettina
Gunn, Jane
Halliday, Jane
Bell, Robin
Lewis, Sharon
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 8
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2008-05-28
ISSN 1472-6963
Summary Background: Recent developments have made screening tests for foetal abnormalities available earlier in pregnancy and women have a range of testing options accessible to them. It is now recommended that all women, regardless of their age, are provided with information on prenatal screening tests. General Practitioners (GPs) are often the first health professionals a woman consults in pregnancy. As such, GPs are well positioned to inform women of the increasing range of prenatal screening tests available. The aim of this study was to explore GPs experience of informing women of prenatal genetic screening tests for foetal abnormality.
Methods: A qualitative study consisting of four focus groups was conducted in metropolitan and rural Victoria, Australia. A discussion guide was used and the audio-taped transcripts were independently coded
by two researchers using thematic analysis. Multiple coders and analysts and informant feedback were employed to reduce the potential for researcher bias and increase the validity of the findings.
Results: Six themes were identified and classified as 'intrinsic' if they occurred within the context of the consultation or 'extrinsic' if they consisted of elements that impacted on the GP beyond the scope of the
consultation. The three intrinsic themes were the way GPs explained the limitations of screening, the extent to which GPs provided information selectively and the time pressures at play. The three extrinsic
factors were GPs' attitudes and values towards screening, the conflict they experienced in offering screening information and the sense of powerlessness within the screening test process and the health
care system generally. Extrinsic themes reveal GPs' attitudes and values to screening and to disability, as well as raising questions about the fundamental premise of testing.
Conclusion: The increasing availability and utilisation of screening tests, in particular first trimester tests,has expanded GPs' role in facilitating women's informed decision-making. Recognition of the importance
of providing this complex information warrants longer consultations to respond to the time pressures that GPs experience. Understanding the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that impact on GPs may serve to shape
educational resources to be more appropriate, relevant and supportive.
Notes This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-8-114
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Nagle et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017458

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.