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Use of a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities to improve women's informed decision making: a cluster randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN22532458]

Nagle, C., Gunn, J., Bell, R., Meiser, B. and Halliday, J. 2008, Use of a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities to improve women's informed decision making: a cluster randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN22532458], International journal of gynecology & obstetrics, vol. 115, no. 3, pp. 339-347, doi: 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2007.01576.x.

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Title Use of a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities to improve women's informed decision making: a cluster randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN22532458]
Author(s) Nagle, C.ORCID iD for Nagle, C. orcid.org/0000-0002-5661-6379
Gunn, J.
Bell, R.
Meiser, B.
Halliday, J.
Journal name International journal of gynecology & obstetrics
Volume number 115
Issue number 3
Start page 339
End page 347
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Place of publication Limerick, Ireland
Publication date 2008-01
ISSN 0020-7292
Keyword(s) Decision aid
decisional conflict
informed choice
parental testing
Summary Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities compared with a pamphlet in supporting women's decision making.
Design A cluster randomised controlled trial.
Setting Primary health care.
Population Women in early pregnancy consulting a GP.
Methods GPs were randomised to provide women with either a decision aid or a pamphlet. The decision aid was a 24-page booklet designed using the Ottowa Decision Framework. The pamphlet was an existing resource available in the trial setting.
Main outcome measures Validated scales were used to measure the primary outcomes, informed choice and decisional conflict, and the secondary outcomes, anxiety, depression, attitudes to the pregnancy/fetus and acceptability of the resource. Outcomes were measured at 14 weeks of gestation from questionnaires that women completed and returned by post.
Findings Women in the intervention group were more likely to make an informed decision 76% (126/165) than those in the control group 65% (107/165) (adjusted OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.14–3.81). A greater proportion of women in the intervention group 88% (147/167) had a 'good' level of knowledge than those in the control group 72% (123/171) (adjusted OR 3.43; 95% CI 1.79–6.58). Mean (SD) decisional conflict scores were low in both groups, decision aid 1.71 (0.49), pamphlet 1.65 (0.55) (adjusted mean difference 0.10; 95% CI −0.02 to 0.22). There was no strong evidence of differences between the trial arms in the measures of psychological or acceptability outcomes.
Conclusion A tailored prenatal testing decision aid plays an important role in improving women's knowledge of first and second trimester screening tests and assisting them to make decisions about screening and diagnostic tests that are consistent with their values.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2007.01576.x
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017459

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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