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Barriers to cross-fertilization between populations of a widely dispersed Polychaete species are unlikely to have arisen through gametic compatibility arms-races

Styan, Craig, Kupriyanova, Elena and Havenhand, Jon 2008, Barriers to cross-fertilization between populations of a widely dispersed Polychaete species are unlikely to have arisen through gametic compatibility arms-races, Evolution, vol. 62, no. 12, pp. 3041-3055, doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00521.x.

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Title Barriers to cross-fertilization between populations of a widely dispersed Polychaete species are unlikely to have arisen through gametic compatibility arms-races
Author(s) Styan, Craig
Kupriyanova, Elena
Havenhand, Jon
Journal name Evolution
Volume number 62
Issue number 12
Start page 3041
End page 3055
Publisher The Society for the Study of Evolution
Place of publication Lancaster, Pa.
Publication date 2008-12
ISSN 0014-3820
1558-5646
Summary Although there are theoretical reasons to suspect that gametic incompatibility may develop readily among populations of broadcast spawning marine invertebrates, there have been very few studies documenting geographic patterns of interpopulation incompatibility for any species. To address this we determined how successfully individuals of the intertidal serpulid polychaete, Galeolaria caespitosa, can cross-fertilize within and among populations from across temperate Australia. Fertilization assays revealed asymmetrical differences between very distantly located populations from different coasts, with near-complete incompatibility between eggs from Sydney with sperm from Adelaide, but the reverse cross (Adelaide eggs, Sydney sperm) was reasonably compatible. Although that pattern was congruent with a clear difference in Cytochrome B sequences between worms on the south and east coasts of Australia, we also detected some indication of interpopulation incompatibility within the genetic grouping on east coast, between two populations separated by only 220 km. We then assessed whether commonly proposed gametic compatibility arms-races could account for these patterns. Our results suggest reduced gametic compatibility may reduce a female's maximum fertilization potential, resulting in a cost to this potential mechanism for reducing polyspermy. Consequently, the apparently rapid development of reproductive barriers here seems unlikely to have been driven by arms-races involving sexual conflict over fertilization rate.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00521.x
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017481

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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