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Evaluation of nasopharyngeal oxygen, nasal prongs and facemask oxygen therapy devices in adult patients: a randomised crossover trial

Eastwood, G. M., O'Connell, B., Gardner, A. and Considine, J. 2008, Evaluation of nasopharyngeal oxygen, nasal prongs and facemask oxygen therapy devices in adult patients: a randomised crossover trial, Anaesthesia and intensive care, vol. 36, no. 5, pp. 691-694.

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Title Evaluation of nasopharyngeal oxygen, nasal prongs and facemask oxygen therapy devices in adult patients: a randomised crossover trial
Author(s) Eastwood, G. M.
O'Connell, B.
Gardner, A.
Considine, J.ORCID iD for Considine, J. orcid.org/0000-0003-3801-2456
Journal name Anaesthesia and intensive care
Volume number 36
Issue number 5
Start page 691
End page 694
Total pages 4
Publisher Australian Society of Anaesthetists
Place of publication [Sydney, N.S.W.]
Publication date 2008-09
ISSN 0310-057X
1448-0271
Keyword(s) nasopharyngeal oxygen
nasal prongs
facemask oxygen
Summary Nasopharyngeal oxygen (NPO) therapy may overcome some of the difficulties associated with nasal prongs and facemask oxygen delivery devices. In response to a lack of published studies of NPO therapy in adults, we conducted a prospective randomised crossover trial to compare the effectiveness of NPO, nasal prongs (NP) and facemasks (FM) when used in an adult population (n=37) from the intensive care unit and general hospital wards. We measured oxygen saturation (Sp[O.sub.2]) using pulse oximetry, oxygen flow (litres per minute), respiration rate (per minute) and comfort using a horizontal visual analogue scale. All three devices were effective in maintaining a Sp[O.sub.2] of [greater than or equal to]95% (NP 97.0[+ or -]1.9, NPO 97.7[+ or -]1.7, FM 98.8[+ or -]1.3%). NPO therapy consumed less oxygen than NP and FM therapy (NP 2.6[+ or -]1.0, NPO 2.2[+ or -]0.9, FM 6.1[+ or -]0.4 l/min, P <0.001). There was no significant difference in patients' respiratory rates (NP 19.9[+ or -]3.2, NPO 19.9[+ or -]3.0, FM 19.8[+ or -]3.1 per minute, P=0.491). In terms of comfort, patients rated NP higher than NPO and FM using a horizontal visual analogue scale (100 mm=most comfortable) (NP 65.5[+ or -]14.3, NPO 62.8[+ or -]19.4, FM 49.4[+ or -]21.4 mm, P <0.001). We conclude that for adult patients, nasal prongs and nasopharyngeal oxygen therapy consume less oxygen and provide greater comfort than facemasks while still maintaining Sp[O.sub.2] [greater than or equal to]95%.
Language eng
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2008, Australian Society of Anaesthetists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017486

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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