Openly accessible

Designing blended learning in higher education : the neomillenial learner and mediated immersion

Le Rossignol, Karen 2009, Designing blended learning in higher education : the neomillenial learner and mediated immersion, International journal of the humanities, vol. 6, no. 10, pp. 53-60.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
lerossignol-designingblended-2009.pdf Published version application/pdf 572.10KB 432

Title Designing blended learning in higher education : the neomillenial learner and mediated immersion
Author(s) Le Rossignol, Karen
Journal name International journal of the humanities
Volume number 6
Issue number 10
Start page 53
End page 60
Total pages 8
Publisher Common Ground
Place of publication Altona, Vic.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1447-9508
1447-9559
Keyword(s) blended learning
millennial learner
experiential
neomillennial learning styles
mediated immersion
Summary Blended learning as a term and a learning approach is still being refined, at times debated as a legitimate area of research, at times seen as the answer to the conundrum and challenges of the digital learner. Is it the Emperor’s new clothes? As Morrison (2003) suggests, blended learning could be seen as an uncertain or unsure strategy, or alternatively a way to find a solution to promises given for e-learning. Three case studies within this paper explore the possibilities of e-learning within a work-based framework. Elements of ‘neomillenial learning styles’ (Dede in Educause Quarterly vol 28 No 1 2005) reflected by students in postgraduate coursework programs provided the challenge and stimulation of designing and facilitating e-learning components, incorporating experiential or action learning with ‘associational’ approaches rather than linear ones. The journey to virtual simulations such as the postgraduate Newlandia incorporates the learner perspective, or how to activate neomillenial learning styles; blended learning with online and face-to-face community activist groups working for solutions to a water problem; and a virtual scenario which can appeal to and engage an internationalised user group. Do Dede’s neomillenial learners synthesise and process experiences rather than (or as well as) information? Is this mediated immersion a part of Newlandia’s applicability to the modern learner? The student teams of community activists and project managers described in the case studies incorporate a potent mix of learning styles, nationalities and backgrounds, expectations, interpersonal and technical skills and indicate a trend in millennial learners towards a community of knowledge which is collaborative, mobile and group-focused.
Language eng
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Common Ground
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017517

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 482 Abstract Views, 432 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 14 Aug 2009, 13:54:11 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.