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Responses of the hypothalamopituitary adrenal axis and the sympathoadrenal system to isolation/restraint stress in sheep of different adiposity

Tilbrook, Alan J., Rivalland, Elizabeth A. T., Turner, Anne I., Lambert, Gavin W. and Clarke, Iain J. 2008, Responses of the hypothalamopituitary adrenal axis and the sympathoadrenal system to isolation/restraint stress in sheep of different adiposity, Neuroendocrinology : international journal for basic and clinical studies on neuroendocrine relationships, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 193-205, doi: 10.1159/000117576.

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Title Responses of the hypothalamopituitary adrenal axis and the sympathoadrenal system to isolation/restraint stress in sheep of different adiposity
Author(s) Tilbrook, Alan J.
Rivalland, Elizabeth A. T.
Turner, Anne I.ORCID iD for Turner, Anne I. orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Lambert, Gavin W.
Clarke, Iain J.
Journal name Neuroendocrinology : international journal for basic and clinical studies on neuroendocrine relationships
Volume number 87
Issue number 4
Start page 193
End page 205
Total pages 13
Publisher S. Karger AG
Place of publication Basel,Switzerland
Publication date 2008
ISSN 0028-3835
1423-0194
Keyword(s) stress
cortisol
adrenocorticotropic hormone
catecholamines
adipose tissue
Summary There is evidence that levels of adipose tissue can influence responses of the hypothalamopituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress in humans and rats but this has not been explored in sheep. Also, little is known about the sympathoadrenal responses to stress in individuals with relatively different levels of adipose tissue. We tested the hypothesis that the stress-induced activation of the HPA axis and sympathoadrenal system is lower in ovariectomized ewes with low levels of body fat (lean) than ovariectomized ewes with high levels of body fat (fat). Ewes underwent dietary manipulation for 3 months to yield a group of lean ewes (n = 7) with a mean (±SEM) live weight of 39.1 ± 0.9 kg and body fat of 8.9 ± 0.6% and fat ewes (n = 7) with a mean (±SEM) live weight of 69.0 ± 1.8 kg and body fat of 31.7 ± 3.4%. Fat ewes also had higher circulating concentrations of leptin than lean ewes. Blood samples were collected every 15 min over 8 h when no stress was imposed (control day) and on a separate day when 4 h of isolation/restraint was imposed after 4 h of pretreatment sampling (stress day). Plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, epinephrine and norepinephrine did not change significantly over the control day and did not differ between lean and fat ewes. Stress did not affect plasma leptin levels. All stress hormones increased significantly during isolation/restraint stress. The ACTH, cortisol and epinephrine responses were greater in fat ewes than lean ewes but norepinephrine responses were similar. Our results suggest that relative levels of adipose tissue influence the stress-induced activity of the hypothalamopituitary-adrenal axis and some aspects of the sympathoadrenal system with fat animals having higher responses than lean animals.
Language eng
DOI 10.1159/000117576
Field of Research 110306 Endocrinology
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, S. Karger AG
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017560

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