Domestic violence and the exemption from seeking child support : providing safety or legitimizing ongoing poverty and fear

Patrick, Rebecca, Cook, Kay and McKenzie, Hayley 2008, Domestic violence and the exemption from seeking child support : providing safety or legitimizing ongoing poverty and fear, Social policy and administration : an international journal of policy and research, vol. 42, no. 7, pp. 749-767.

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Title Domestic violence and the exemption from seeking child support : providing safety or legitimizing ongoing poverty and fear
Author(s) Patrick, Rebecca
Cook, Kay
McKenzie, Hayley
Journal name Social policy and administration : an international journal of policy and research
Volume number 42
Issue number 7
Start page 749
End page 767
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publication date 2008-12
ISSN 0144-5596
Keyword(s) Child support
Domestic violence
Welfare
Women
Australia
Summary This article examines the experience of low-income women on welfare in Australia and the process of seeking child support from a violent ex-partner, contrasting this with research from the United States and the United Kingdom. Women in Australia who fear ongoing or renewed abuse as a result of seeking child support are eligible for an exemption. However, the exemption policy does not necessarily provide the intended protection of women and children from ongoing abuse and poverty. The exemption policy route also produces an unintended outcome whereby the perpetrators of violence are financially rewarded as they do not have to pay child support. These outcomes are shaped by a complex interaction of personal, cultural and structural forces that make the process of seeking child support for women who have experienced violence extremely problematic. The article demonstrates how in Australia, as in the US and UK policy contexts, the needs of women and their children are compromised by the details of policy specification and the way policies are implemented within the different systems.
Language eng
Field of Research 160512 Social Policy
Socio Economic Objective 920208 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017647

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Higher Education Research Group
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