The relationship between dissociation and binge eating

Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew and Mussap, Alexander J. 2008, The relationship between dissociation and binge eating, Journal of trauma and dissociation : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 445-462.

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Title The relationship between dissociation and binge eating
Author(s) Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew
Mussap, Alexander J.
Journal name Journal of trauma and dissociation : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation
Volume number 9
Issue number 4
Start page 445
End page 462
Total pages 18
Publisher The Haworth Maltreatment & Trauma Press
Place of publication Binghamton, N.Y.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1529-9732
Keyword(s) peritraumatic dissociation
dissociation
PTSD
posttraumatic stress
predictors
Summary Despite research findings demonstrating a relationship between dissociation and binge eating, the psychological processes that may underlie this association remain unclear. The present study examined 2 potential explanations: (a) that dissociation disinhibits behavioral control over eating and (b) that dissociation interferes with self-awareness and undermines body image. A total of 151 female university students completed measures of dissociation, body dissatisfaction, impulsivity, internalization of the thin ideal, body comparison, and binge eating. Correlations confirmed the presence of a relationship between dissociation and binge eating, and regression analyses revealed that this relationship is limited to body-specific (somatic) symptoms of dissociation. Path analyses identified body dissatisfaction, comparison, and impulsivity as significant mediators of this relationship. However, inclusion of all 3 mediated paths in a full model revealed that only body dissatisfaction is a unique mediator. The relevance of somatic symptoms, and the unique contribution of body dissatisfaction as a mediator, are consistent with an explanation of the relationship between dissociation and binge eating that is based on a vulnerability of body image. The results emphasize the need for future research to consider the relation of dissociation to a broader range of disordered eating symptoms than simply binge eating.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Routledge
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017654

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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