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Determination of trans fatty acid levels by FTIR in processed foods in Australia

McCarthy, Justine, Barr, Daniel and Sinclair, Andrew 2008, Determination of trans fatty acid levels by FTIR in processed foods in Australia, Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 391-396.

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Title Determination of trans fatty acid levels by FTIR in processed foods in Australia
Formatted title Determination of trans fatty acid levels by FTIR in processed foods in Australia
Author(s) McCarthy, Justine
Barr, Daniel
Sinclair, Andrew
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 17
Issue number 3
Start page 391
End page 396
Total pages 6
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication McKinnon, Vic.
Publication date 2008-09
ISSN 0964-7058
1440-6047
Keyword(s) trans fatty acids
levels in foods
ATR-FTIR analysis
FSANZ
Australian foods
Summary Health authorities around the world advise ‘limiting consumption of trans   fatty acids’, however in Australia the trans fatty acid (TFA) content is not  required to be listed in the nutrition information panel unless a declaration or nutrient claim is made about fatty acids or cholesterol. Since there is limited knowledge about trans fatty acid levels in processed foods available in Australia, this study aimed to determine the levels of TFA in selected food items known to be sources of TFA from previously published studies. Food items (n=92) that contain vegetable oil and a total fat content greater than 5% were included. This criterion was used in conjunction with a review of similar studies where food items were found to contain high levels of trans fatty acids. Lipids were extracted using solvents. Gravimetric methods were used to determine total fat content and trans fatty acid levels were quantified by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. High levels of trans fatty acids were found in certain items in the Australian food supply, with a high degree of variability. Of the samples analysed, 13  contained greater than 1 g of trans fatty acids per serving size, the highest value was 8.1 g/serving. Apart from when the nutrition information panel states that the content is less than a designated low level, food labels sold in Australia do not indicate trans fatty acid levels. We suggested that health authorities seek ways to assist consumers to limit their intakes of trans fatty acids.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 110104 Medical Biochemistry: Lipids
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017671

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.