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The effect of active support training on engagement, opportunities for choice, challenging behaviour and support needs

Koritsas, Stella, Iacono, Teresa, Hamilton, David and Leighton, Daniel 2008, The effect of active support training on engagement, opportunities for choice, challenging behaviour and support needs, Journal of intellectual and developmental disability, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 247-256, doi: 10.1080/13668250802282944.

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Title The effect of active support training on engagement, opportunities for choice, challenging behaviour and support needs
Author(s) Koritsas, Stella
Iacono, Teresa
Hamilton, David
Leighton, Daniel
Journal name Journal of intellectual and developmental disability
Volume number 33
Issue number 3
Start page 247
End page 256
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1366-8250
1469-9532
Keyword(s) intellectual disability
active support
engagement
activity
challenging behaviour
choice
support needs
Summary Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate active support (AS) training and to investigate changes to perceived engagement in domestic tasks, opportunities for choice, frequency of challenging behaviour, and level of support needs.

Method: Participants were 12 adults with ID aged 27–57 years (M = 37 years) residing in three group homes, and their support workers. The support workers completed assessments on three occasions (at baseline, post-training, and at follow-up).

Results: Residents' engagement in domestic tasks increased over time, and overall choice increased, although perceived choice in two life domains initially increased, but decreased to baseline levels at follow-up. Residents exhibited an overall decrease in anxiety, self-absorbed behaviour, disruptive behaviour, and problem behaviour in general. There was also an overall decrease in perceived support needs for five activity domains, with no change for one domain.

Conclusions: The results contribute to a growing body of evidence demonstrating favourable outcomes of AS in terms of engagement and challenging behaviour in people with ID. Surprising results are presented for choice and perceived support needs, warranting further investigation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13668250802282944
Field of Research 111703 Care for Disabled
Socio Economic Objective 920204 Evaluation of Health Outcomes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Australasian Society for the Study of Intellectual Disability Inc
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017674

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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