Undernutrition during suckling in rats elevates plasma adiponectin and its receptor in skeletal muscle regardless of diet composition : a protective effect?

Prior, L. J., Velkoska, E., Watts, R., Cameron-Smith, David and Morris, M. J. 2008, Undernutrition during suckling in rats elevates plasma adiponectin and its receptor in skeletal muscle regardless of diet composition : a protective effect?, International journal of obesity, vol. 32, no. 10, pp. 1585-1594.

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Title Undernutrition during suckling in rats elevates plasma adiponectin and its receptor in skeletal muscle regardless of diet composition : a protective effect?
Author(s) Prior, L. J.
Velkoska, E.
Watts, R.
Cameron-Smith, David
Morris, M. J.
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 32
Issue number 10
Start page 1585
End page 1594
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2008-10
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) adiponectin
AdipoR1
CPT-1
programming
Summary Objective:
Nutrition during critical periods in early life may increase the subsequent risk of obesity, hypertension and metabolic diseases in adulthood. Few studies have focused on the long-term consequences of poor nutrition during the suckling period on the susceptibility to developing obesity when exposed to a palatable cafeteria-style high-fat diet (CD) after weaning.

Design:
This study examined the impact of early undernutrition, followed by CD exposure, on blood pressure, hormones and genes important for insulin sensitivity and metabolism and skeletal muscle mRNA expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), carnitine palmitoyl-transferase I (CPT-1), cytochrome c oxidase 4 (COX4) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Following normal gestation, Sprague–Dawley rat litters were adjusted to 18 (undernourished) or 12 (control) pups. Rats were weaned (day 21) onto either palatable CD or standard chow.

Results:
Early undernourished rats were significantly lighter than control by 17 days, persisting into adulthood only when animals were fed chow after weaning. Regardless of litter size, rats fed CD had doubled fat mass at 15 weeks of age, and significant elevations in plasma leptin, insulin and adiponectin. Importantly, undernutrition confined to the suckling period, elevated circulating adiponectin regardless of post-weaning diet. Blood pressure was reduced in early undernourished rats fed chow, and increased by CD. Early undernutrition was associated with long-term elevations in the expression of AdipoR1, CPT-1, COX4 and PPARalpha in skeletal muscle.

Conclusion:
This study demonstrates the important role of early nutrition on body weight and metabolism, suggesting early undernourishment enhances insulin sensitivity and fatty-acid oxidation. The long-term potential benefit of limiting nutrition in the early postnatal period warrants further investigation.
Language eng
Field of Research 110306 Endocrinology
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Macmillan Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017693

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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