You are not logged in.

Vascular distribution of nitric oxide synthase and vasodilation in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri

Jennings, Brett L., Blake, Rachel E., Joss, Jean M. P. and Donald, John A. 2008, Vascular distribution of nitric oxide synthase and vasodilation in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A : molecular & integrative physiology, vol. 151, no. 4, pp. 590-595, doi: 10.1016/j.cbpa.2008.07.018.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Vascular distribution of nitric oxide synthase and vasodilation in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri
Formatted title Vascular distribution of nitric oxide synthase and vasodilation in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri
Author(s) Jennings, Brett L.
Blake, Rachel E.
Joss, Jean M. P.
Donald, John A.ORCID iD for Donald, John A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5930-2642
Journal name Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A : molecular & integrative physiology
Volume number 151
Issue number 4
Start page 590
End page 595
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier Science
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2008-12
ISSN 1095-6433
1531-4332
Keyword(s) lungfish
neoceratodus forsteri
nitric oxide
Nitric oxide synthase
prostaglandins
Summary The presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and role of nitric oxide (NO) in vascular regulation was investigated in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri. No evidence was found for NOS in the endothelium of large and small blood vessels following processing for NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. However, both NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and neural NOS immunohistochemistry demonstrated a sparse network of nitrergic nerves in the dorsal aorta, hepatic artery, and branchial arteries, but there were no nitrergic nerves in small blood vessels in tissues. In contrast, nitrergic nerves were found in non-vascular tissues of the lung, gut and kidney. Dual-wire myography was used to determine if NO signalling occurred in the branchial artery of N. forsteri. Both SNP and SIN-1 had no effect on the pre-constricted branchial artery, but the particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC) activator, C-type natriuretic peptide, always caused vasodilation. Nicotine mediated a dilation that was not inhibited by the soluble GC inhibitor, ODQ, or the NOS inhibitor, L-NNA, but was blocked by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin. These data suggest that NO control of the branchial artery is lacking, but that prostaglandins could be endothelial relaxing factors in the vasculature of lungfish.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.cbpa.2008.07.018
Field of Research 060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017740

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 571 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 14 Aug 2009, 13:56:39 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.