Outcomes of a group-randomized trial to prevent excess weight gain, reduce screen behaviours and promote physical activity in 10-year-old children : switch-play

Salmon, J., Ball, K., Hume, C., Booth, M. and Crawford, D. 2008, Outcomes of a group-randomized trial to prevent excess weight gain, reduce screen behaviours and promote physical activity in 10-year-old children : switch-play, International journal of obesity, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 601-612.

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Title Outcomes of a group-randomized trial to prevent excess weight gain, reduce screen behaviours and promote physical activity in 10-year-old children : switch-play
Author(s) Salmon, J.
Ball, K.
Hume, C.
Booth, M.
Crawford, D.
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 32
Issue number 4
Start page 601
End page 612
Total pages 12
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2008-04
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) group-randomized trial
overweight
physical activity
screen behaviours
moderating
generalized estimating equations
Summary Objectives : To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention to prevent excess weight gain, reduce time spent in screen behaviours, promote participation in and enjoyment of physical activity (PA), and improve fundamental movement skills among children.

Participants : In 2002, 311 children (78% response; 49% boys), average age 10 years 8 months, were recruited from three government schools in low socioeconomic areas of Melbourne, Australia.

Design : Group-randomized controlled trial. Children were randomized by class to one of the four conditions: a behavioural modification group (BM; n=66); a fundamental movement skills group (FMS; n=74); a combined BM/FMS group (BM/FMS; n=93); and a control (usual curriculum) group (n=62). Data were collected at baseline, post intervention, 6- and 12-month follow-up periods.

Results : BMI data were available for 295 children at baseline and 268 at 12-month follow-up. After adjusting for food intake and PA, there was a significant intervention effect from baseline to post intervention on age- and sex-adjusted BMI in the BM/FMS group compared with controls (-1.88 kg m-2, P<0.01), which was maintained at 6- and 12-month follow-up periods (-1.53 kg m-2, P<0.05). Children in the BM/FMS group were less likely than controls to be overweight/obese between baseline and post intervention (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=0.36, P<0.05); also maintained at 12-month follow-up (AOR=0.38, P<0.05). Compared with controls, FMS group children recorded higher levels and greater enjoyment of PA; and BM children recorded higher levels of PA and TV viewing across all four time points. Gender moderated the intervention effects for participation in and enjoyment of PA, and fundamental movement skills.

Conclusion :
This programme represents a promising approach to preventing excess weight gain and promoting participation in and enjoyment of PA. Examination of the mediators of this intervention and further tailoring of the programme to suit both genders is required.
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017770

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