Job stress in the law enforcement sector: comparing the linear, non-linear and interaction effects of working conditions

Noblet, Andrew, Rodwell, John and Allisey, Amanda 2009, Job stress in the law enforcement sector: comparing the linear, non-linear and interaction effects of working conditions, Stress and health, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 111-120.

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Title Job stress in the law enforcement sector: comparing the linear, non-linear and interaction effects of working conditions
Author(s) Noblet, Andrew
Rodwell, John
Allisey, Amanda
Journal name Stress and health
Volume number 25
Issue number 1
Start page 111
End page 120
Total pages 10
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 1532-3005
1532-2998
Keyword(s) job stress
well-being
job satisfaction
organizational commitment
law enforcement
Summary This study addresses a gap in much of the research involving stress among high-risk occupations by investigating the effects of linear, non-linear and interaction models in a law enforcement organization that has undertaken a series of efficiency-driven organizational reforms. The results of a survey involving 2085 police officers indicated that the demand-control-support model provided good utility in predicting an officer's satisfaction, commitment and well-being. In particular, social support and job control were closely associated with all three outcome variables. Although the demand × control/support interactions were not identified in the data, there was some support for the curvilinear effects of job demands. The results have implications for the organizational conditions that need to be addressed in contemporary policing environments where new public management strategies have had widespread affects on the social and organizational context in which policing takes place.
Language eng
Field of Research 150311 Organisational Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2008, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017772

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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