Evaluation of the implementation of a state government community design policy aimed at increasing local walking : design issues and baseline results from RESIDE, Perth Western Australia

Giles-Corti, Billie, Knuiman, Matthew, Timperio, Anna, Van Niel, Kimberley, Pikora, Terry J., Bull, Fiona C. L., Shilton, Trevor and Bulsara, Max 2008, Evaluation of the implementation of a state government community design policy aimed at increasing local walking : design issues and baseline results from RESIDE, Perth Western Australia, Preventive medicine, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 46-54.

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Title Evaluation of the implementation of a state government community design policy aimed at increasing local walking : design issues and baseline results from RESIDE, Perth Western Australia
Author(s) Giles-Corti, Billie
Knuiman, Matthew
Timperio, Anna
Van Niel, Kimberley
Pikora, Terry J.
Bull, Fiona C. L.
Shilton, Trevor
Bulsara, Max
Journal name Preventive medicine
Volume number 46
Issue number 1
Start page 46
End page 54
Total pages 9
Publisher Academic Press
Place of publication San Diego, Calif.
Publication date 2008-01
ISSN 0091-7435
1096-0260
Keyword(s) environment
neighborhood
walking
physical activity measurement
urban design
longitudinal
Summary Objectives.
To describe the design and baseline results of an evaluation of the Western Australian government's pedestrian-friendly subdivision design code (Liveable Neighborhood (LN) Guidelines).
Methods.

Baseline results (2003–2005) from a longitudinal study of people (n = 1813) moving into new housing developments: 18 Liveable, 11 Hybrid and 45 Conventional (i.e., LDs, HDs and CDs respectively) are presented including usual recreational and transport-related walking undertaken within and outside the neighborhood, and 7-day pedometer steps.
Results.

At baseline, more participants walked for recreation and transport within the neighborhood (52.6%; 36.1% respectively), than outside the neighborhood (17.7%; 13.2% respectively). Notably, only 20% of average total duration of walking (128.4 min/week (SD159.8)) was transport related and within the neighborhood. There were few differences between the groups' demographic, psychosocial and perceived neighborhood environmental characteristics, pedometer steps, or the type, amount and location of self-reported walking (p > 0.05). However, asked what factors influenced their choice of housing development, more participants moving into LDs reported aspects of their new neighborhood's walkability as important (p < 0.05).
Conclusions.

The baseline results underscore the desirability of incorporating behavior and context-specific measures and value of longitudinal designs to enable changes in behavior, attitudes, and urban form to be monitored, while adjusting for baseline residential location preferences.
Language eng
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Elsevier Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017799

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