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Predictive mapping of powerful owl (Ninox strenua) breeding sites using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in urban Melbourne, Australia

Isaac, Bronwyn, Cooke, Raylene, Simmons, Dianne and Hogan, Fiona 2008, Predictive mapping of powerful owl (Ninox strenua) breeding sites using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in urban Melbourne, Australia, Landscape and urban planning, vol. 84, no. 3-4, pp. 212-218, doi: 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2007.08.002.

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Title Predictive mapping of powerful owl (Ninox strenua) breeding sites using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in urban Melbourne, Australia
Formatted title Predictive mapping of powerful owl (Ninox strenua) breeding sites using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in urban Melbourne, Australia
Author(s) Isaac, Bronwyn
Cooke, RayleneORCID iD for Cooke, Raylene orcid.org/0000-0002-8843-7113
Simmons, Dianne
Hogan, Fiona
Journal name Landscape and urban planning
Volume number 84
Issue number 3-4
Start page 212
End page 218
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier B.V.
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2008-03-03
ISSN 0169-2046
1872-6062
Keyword(s) raptors
owls
threatened
urbanization
predictive mapping
habitat utilization
GIS
Summary Urban expansion is a principal process threatening biodiversity globally. It is predicted that over half of the world's population will reside in urban centres by 2010. If we are to conserve biodiversity, a shift in perspective from traditional ecological studies based in natural environments, to studies based in less natural environments is paramount. To effectively conserve species which occur in urban environments, comprehensive analysis is necessary to determine the processes that are driving this urban usage. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) technology provides a valuable tool for efficient spatial analysis and predictive mapping of species distributions.

This study used GIS to analyze current breeding sites for the powerful owl, a vulnerable top order predator in urban Melbourne, Australia. GIS analysis suggests that a number of ecological attributes were influencing powerful owl usage of urban environments. Using these ecological attributes, predictive mapping was undertaken, which identified a number of potential breeding sites for powerful owls within urbanized Melbourne.

Urban environments are traditionally perceived as “the wastelands” of natural environments, however, this study demonstrates that they have the potential to support apex predators, an important finding for the management of rare and threatened species.
Notes Available online 19 September 2007
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2007.08.002
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Socio Economic Objective 961310 Remnant Vegetation and Protected Conservation Areas in Urban and Industrial Environments
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Elsevier B.V.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017842

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