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Professional attitudes towards deliberate self-harm in patients with borderline personality disorder

Commons Treloar, Amanda J. and Lewis, Andrew J. 2008, Professional attitudes towards deliberate self-harm in patients with borderline personality disorder, Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry, vol. 42, no. 7, pp. 578-584, doi: 10.1080/00048670802119796.

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Title Professional attitudes towards deliberate self-harm in patients with borderline personality disorder
Author(s) Commons Treloar, Amanda J.
Lewis, Andrew J.
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
Volume number 42
Issue number 7
Start page 578
End page 584
Total pages 7
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2008
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Keyword(s) borderline personality disorder
clinical training
professional attitudes
self-harm
Summary Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the attitudes of mental health and emergency medicine clinicians towards patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. The clinician gender, primary occupation and service setting, level of university training and years of experience, frequency of clinical contact, and completion of specific training in borderline personality disorder were expected to influence the attitudes of health professionals towards working with borderline patients that engage in self-harm.

Method: A purpose-designed questionnaire and an assessment tool to quantify attitudinal levels were used to collect demographic information and assess the attitudes of 140 mental health and emergency medicine practitioners across two Australian health services and a New Zealand health service.

Results: Statistically and clinically significant differences were found between emergency medical staff and mental health clinicians in their attitudes towards working with borderline personality disorder. The strongest predictor of attitudes was whether the clinician worked in emergency medicine or mental health. This was followed by years of experience and specific training in personality disorders as significant predictors of attitudes to self-harm.

Conclusions: The implications of these findings for the professional training of clinicians in the management and treatment of borderline personality disorder patients are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/00048670802119796
Field of Research 170106 Health
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017851

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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