You are not logged in.

Diagnosing borderline personality disorder : examination of how clinical indicators are used by professionals in the health setting

Commons Treloar, Amanda Jane and Lewis, Andrew J. 2009, Diagnosing borderline personality disorder : examination of how clinical indicators are used by professionals in the health setting, Clinical psychologist, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 21-27, doi: 10.1080/13284200802392536.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Diagnosing borderline personality disorder : examination of how clinical indicators are used by professionals in the health setting
Author(s) Commons Treloar, Amanda Jane
Lewis, Andrew J.
Journal name Clinical psychologist
Volume number 13
Issue number 1
Start page 21
End page 27
Total pages 7
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2009-03
ISSN 1328-4207
1742-9552
Keyword(s) borderline personality disorder
clinical indicators
diagnosis
risk factors
Summary This paper reviews the history of the recognition of borderline personality disorder as a clinical disorder, followed by a review of the contemporary practice of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in psychiatric settings. Many researchers have cautioned against the conflation of difficult patients with the diagnostic category of borderline personality disorder. The current study examines how clinical indicators used to screen for this complex disorder differ across service settings, professions, specialised training and years of clinical experience. A purpose-designed survey was administered to 108 mental and emergency medicine health practitioners across an Australian health service and a New Zealand health service to record the level of significance placed on different clinical indicators in the application of the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. A heavy reliance was placed on observable behavioural symptoms, such as self-mutilation and impulsive behaviours that are self-damaging, in the screening of borderline personality disorder as a psychiatric diagnosis. Statistically significant differences were found between emergency medical staff and mental health clinicians in their use of diagnostic indicators of borderline personality disorder, χ2(4) = 17.248, p = .002. Implications of these findings for the screening, assessment and diagnosis of patients with borderline personality disorder are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13284200802392536
Field of Research 170106 Health
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2009, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017854

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 771 Abstract Views, 56 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 14 Aug 2009, 13:57:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.