Estimating post-release survival and the influential factors for recreationally caught Black Bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) in the Glenelg River, south eastern Australia

Grixti, Daniel, Conron, Simon D., Morison, Alexander and Jones, Paul L. 2008, Estimating post-release survival and the influential factors for recreationally caught Black Bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) in the Glenelg River, south eastern Australia, Fisheries research, vol. 92, no. 2-3, pp. 303-313.

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Title Estimating post-release survival and the influential factors for recreationally caught Black Bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) in the Glenelg River, south eastern Australia
Formatted title Estimating post-release survival and the influential factors for recreationally caught Black Bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) in the Glenelg River, south eastern Australia
Author(s) Grixti, Daniel
Conron, Simon D.
Morison, Alexander
Jones, Paul L.
Journal name Fisheries research
Volume number 92
Issue number 2-3
Start page 303
End page 313
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier B.V.
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2008-08
ISSN 0165-7836
1872-6763
Keyword(s) post-release survival
hooking mortality
hooking location
acanthopagrus butcheri
recreational fishing
post-mortem
Summary Black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) is the main target species amongst the estuarine recreational fisheries of Victoria, Australia. The A. butcheri fishery is managed through legal-minimum length and daily bag limits. The success of this management strategy requires that the survival rate for released fish is high. This study used the most common angling practices to estimate post-release survival and identify influential factors for undersized A. butcheri in Victoria. In total 1557 and 923 A. butcheri were caught and monitored for initial (≤1 h) and delayed (72 h) survival, respectively. Fish were caught across 3 years, with each year separated into cold and warm water periods with 8 fishing trial days in total. Only 1 of the 266 controls used to assess confinement effects died. Total survival was 95% (S.E. ± 0.8%) for shallow- and 74% (S.E. ± 3%) for deep-hooked fish and decreased as fish length increased. A post-mortem (PM) procedure was developed and showed that throat and gill injuries were the most frequent cause of deep-hooking death. It revealed that 97% of hooks left in fish remained there after 72 h and identified hooking location inaccuracies recorded at the time of capture. Total survival for deep-hooked fish was 20% higher when hooks were left in the fish. Deep-hooked fish were more likely to bleed when hooks were removed and total survival was lower for fish that bleed (58%) than fish that did not bleed (80%). Shallow-hooking rates decreased as fish length increased and were higher during warm water compared to cold water trials. The high shallow-hooking and survival rates observed suggest that A. butcheri survival in the fishery would be high, but deep-hooking has the potential to undermine the management strategy. Determining the shallow-hooking rate in the fishery would help clarify the impact of these findings at the fishery level.
Language eng
Field of Research 070403 Fisheries Management
Socio Economic Objective 960503 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Farmland
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Elsevier B.V.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017884

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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