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Using sister city relationships to access the Chinese market

Mascitelli, Bruno and Chung, Mona 2008, Using sister city relationships to access the Chinese market, Journal of international trade law and policy, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 203-215.

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Title Using sister city relationships to access the Chinese market
Author(s) Mascitelli, Bruno
Chung, Mona
Journal name Journal of international trade law and policy
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 203
End page 215
Total pages 13
Publisher Emerald Publishing Group
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1477-0024
Keyword(s) Australia
China
local government
small to medium-sized enterprises
Summary Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to offer a new approach for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Australia to engage in sustainable trade with China through the use of Sister City relationships. The reason for writing this paper is to address this research gap with the aim of influencing government policy at the national and the local level.

Design/methodology/approach – The main methods used is a historical literature review, a critical review of the effectiveness of the Sister City relationships and an examination of a special Sister City relationship between Latrobe City in Australia and the Chinese city of Taizhou.

Findings – Throughout the course of the paper it was established that Sister City relationships had been insufficiently utilized as commercial facilitators and especially SMEs in regional Australia. This was especially evident in terms of trade relations with China.

Research limitations/implications – This conceptual paper will require further research at different levels. Future research should establish what Australian sister cities with China are actually doing and how a more focused relationship utilizing SMEs in their territory might be utilized. This is clearly a limitation with this conceptual paper, which it is hoped will be overcome with new research planned by the authors.

Practical implications – The practical implications emerging from this paper is that Sister City relationships can be refocused from their current role to becoming structurally integrated into trade facilitators for SMEs in pursuing trade with China. Most Sister City relationships do not have a trade focus in the first instance. As a result of this paper we are hoping that local government policy makers and state government trade facilitators will see Sister City relationships in a new light.

Originality/value – This paper brings to attention cases of Sister City relationships which have gravitated towards a trade focus (an exception like Latrobe City) in which results are already evident. A paper of this kind is directed at governments at all levels as well as SMEs who wish to work better with government.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 150308 International Business
Socio Economic Objective 940599 Work and Institutional Development not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Emerald Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30017955

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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