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Cosmopolitanism, identity and recognition

Van Hooft, Stan 2008, Cosmopolitanism, identity and recognition, International journal of the humanities, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 121-127.

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Title Cosmopolitanism, identity and recognition
Author(s) Van Hooft, Stan
Journal name International journal of the humanities
Volume number 6
Issue number 6
Start page 121
End page 127
Total pages 7
Publisher Common Ground
Place of publication Altona, Vic.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1447-9508
1447-9559
Keyword(s) cosmopolitanism
identity
recognition
Honneth
global justice
development ethics
Summary An application of the social theory of Axel Honneth to global justice, arguing that development goals must include provision for the intersubjective recognition required for identity formation. In the disciplines of Political Philosophy and International Relations cosmopolitanism is often defined as the view that all people, no matter their national, ethnic or religious backgrounds and no matter what their gender, have an equal moral status. The most telling enunciation of this view is the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights. However, the focus that is given to rights and a global form of legal equality by this document and by such theorists as John Rawls is not rich enough to capture all of the ethical demands that global society places upon well-to-do Westerners and developed nations. This paper makes use of a thesis by Axel Honneth to the effect that political thinking needs “a basic conceptual shift to the normative premises of a theory of recognition that locates the core of all experiences of injustice in the withdrawal of social recognition, in the phenomena of humiliation and disrespect.” Honneth identifies three spheres of recognition in modern societies: love, law, and achievement. I offer some exposition of his theory and then argue that global justice must be understood to embrace the substantive ethical values that arise in these three spheres as well as the procedural standards of moral rightness that belongs to the second of them. Such an expanded conception of global justice will yield an enriched conception of cosmopolitanism.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 220319 Social Philosophy
Socio Economic Objective 959999 Cultural Understanding not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Common Ground
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018010

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of International and Political Studies
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