Unfixing knowledges : queering the literacy curriculum

Walsh, Christopher S. 2007, Unfixing knowledges : queering the literacy curriculum, in AARE 2007 : Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference ‘Research impacts : proving or improving?’, Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-24.

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Title Unfixing knowledges : queering the literacy curriculum
Author(s) Walsh, Christopher S.
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research. Conference (2007 : Fremantle, W. A.)
Conference location Fremantle, Western Australia
Conference dates 25 - 29 November 2007
Title of proceedings AARE 2007 : Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference ‘Research impacts : proving or improving?’
Editor(s) Jeffery, Peter L.
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 24
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary In the literacy classroom, students have few opportunities to use their literacy practices to contest narratives of race, class, gender and sexuality. Instead, extensive time is spent completing literacy activities associated with what “good” readers and writers do. Students’ literacy practices are often formulaic, repetitive, and serve classroom management strategies producing a mythic narrative of good literacy teaching. This paper introduces a queer literacy curriculum that poses pedagogy as a series of questions: What does being taught, what does knowledge do to students? How does knowledge become understood in the relationship between teacher/text and student? (Lusted, 1986) It emphasizes developing critical analyses of heterosexism, heteronormativity and normativity with the goal of helping students understand binary categories are not givens, rather social constructions we are often forced to perform (Butler, 1990) through available discourses. The paper highlights an interruption into the literacy curriculum where, through collective memory work, students investigated, analysed and contested the usually-not-noticed ways a small understanding of heterosexuality has come to structure their lives.
Language eng
Field of Research 130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2007, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018079

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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