Climate change and community response in the Borough of Queenscliffe

Fuller, Robert 2008, Climate change and community response in the Borough of Queenscliffe, in Community development and ecology : engaging ecological sustainability through community development : selected papers from a conference held in Melbourne, 26-28 March 2008, Deakin University, Geelong, Vic., pp. 1-11.

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Title Climate change and community response in the Borough of Queenscliffe
Author(s) Fuller, Robert
Conference name Community Development and Ecology (2008 : Melbourne, Victoria)
Conference location Deakin University, Melbourne
Conference dates 26 - 28 March 2008
Title of proceedings Community development and ecology : engaging ecological sustainability through community development : selected papers from a conference held in Melbourne, 26-28 March 2008
Editor(s) Clarke, Matthew
Connors, Phil
Dillon, Jo
Kelly, Max
Kenny, Sue
Publication date 2008
Conference series Community Development and Ecology Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Deakin University
Place of publication Geelong, Vic.
Summary The Borough of Queenscliffe (BoQ) occupies a unique place among coastal Victorian locations. Situated at the tip of the Bellarine Peninsula, the Borough has approximately 3000 permanent residents, one third of who are over 60 years old. The Borough is also the smallest in Victoria, covering a total area of 13 square kilometres. BoQ is also unique because of its location. The Borough is almost totally surrounded by water and much of this is classified as maritime national park. The Swan Bay Marine Reserve is a Ramsar site and is therefore a wetland of international significance. The Borough relies heavily on tourism for its economic livelihood.

This paper begins with an overview of the BoQ in geographic, demographic and economic terms and then discusses the possible effects and impacts of climate change, as they relate to this small community. These sections are viewed from environmental, economic and social perspectives. Environmental impacts include the erosion of the coastal sand dune system and the loss of habitat for the orange-bellied parrot. Social impacts include the health effects and dangers of flooding for low-lying housing. Various indicators of community response are described, particularly the activities of the local climate change action group. Their strategy can essentially be described as a ‘push upward and downward’ approach. Innovative actions to implement this strategy are described in the paper.
ISBN 9781741561197
Language eng
Field of Research 160810 Urban Sociology and Community Studies
Socio Economic Objective 960311 Social Impacts of Climate Change and Variability
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2008, Deakin University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018090

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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