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Developing sustainable communities : the case for Port Phillip Heads historic towns, Sorrento and Queenscliff

de Jong, Ursula and Fuller, Robert 2008, Developing sustainable communities : the case for Port Phillip Heads historic towns, Sorrento and Queenscliff, in SAHANZ 2008 : History in practice : 25th International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 1-24.

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Title Developing sustainable communities : the case for Port Phillip Heads historic towns, Sorrento and Queenscliff
Author(s) de Jong, Ursula
Fuller, Robert
Conference name SAHANZ Conference (25th : 2008 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Australia
Conference dates 3-6 July 2008
Title of proceedings SAHANZ 2008 : History in practice : 25th International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand
Editor(s) Beynon, David
de Jong, Ursula
Publication date 2008
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 1
End page 24
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary The Victorian towns of Sorrento and Queenscliff are located either side of Port Phillip Heads. Using these towns as case studies, this paper examines what happens to historic coastal townships caught up in the phenomenon of sea change. Both towns are currently facing huge planning battles and are trying to argue a case for heritage in the rush for expansion and modernisation. Newcomers like to emulate the metropolis in the seaside towns. Planners in the metropolis are asked to make decisions by developers who are thwarted by local municipalities. These towns encapsulate something of the dilemma that comes with a demographic shift from the metropolitan centre to coastal townships and demonstrate that the transition from urban life and built environment does not translate without cost to a fragile coastal environment. It is place itself that has attracted humans to Sorrento and Queenscliff over centuries. The seascape, the landscape, the environment drew the indigenous peoples here centuries ago. It provided abundant food and was inspiring. Europeans came at the very beginning of the 19th century seeking new lands. By the late decades of the 19th century Europeans discovered the seaside and its health giving qualities and built substantial Victorian edifices to house the influx of visitors and holiday-makers who arrived by ferry. However, not until the second half of the twentieth century did development begin to intrude significantly on the landscape. And by the twenty-first century evidence is mounting that development is destroying the sense and character of place, which initially enticed people to come here.
ISBN 9780958192545
Language eng
Field of Research 120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservation
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2008, SAHANZ
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018096

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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