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Between traditions : the villa and the country house

Rollo, John 2008, Between traditions : the villa and the country house, in SAHANZ 2008 : History in practice : 25th International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 1-29.

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Title Between traditions : the villa and the country house
Author(s) Rollo, John
Conference name SAHANZ Conference (25th : 2008 : Geelong, Vic.)
Conference location Geelong, Australia
Conference dates 3-6 July 2008
Title of proceedings SAHANZ 2008 : History in practice : 25th International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand
Editor(s) Beynon, David
de Jong, Ursula
Publication date 2008
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 1
End page 29
Total pages 29
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary Sir Leslie Martin wrote in 1983, “The formal composition used by Lutyens is something totally related to the problems and culture of his time”. to reinforce this point Martin included a plan of Heathcote (1905) next to an illustration of one of Palladio’s final commissions, the Villa Rotonda (1566). Comparing the planning and symmetry strategies of the two architects, Martin was able to demonstrate how Heathcote embodied an eclectic yet fundamental link between two traditions - the irregularity of an Edwardian planning arrangement, and its containment within the symmetry demanded by the “full classical orchestra of a Doric order” (Hussey, 1950 p128). “Once inside the balanced mass of the exterior, the visitor’s movement through the building is controlled by volumes and composition of a totally different kind” 1. While Palladio appears to have been a significant influence on Lutyens, as revealed in the often quoted letter about the “High Game” which he wrote to Herbert Baker in 1903, few studies appear to explore the extent to which his newfound inspiration went beyond the issue of fenestration in affecting other aspects of his work. The following paper analyses Lutyens’s relationship to Palladio with particular reference to three concepts fundamental to the work of
both architects: proportion, plan arrangement and movement.
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ISBN 9780958192545
Language eng
Field of Research 120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservation
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2008, SAHANZ
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018110

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.