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Officer wellbeing, satisfaction and commitment : job conditions of Australian law enforcement personnel

Allisey, A., Rodwell, J. and Noblet, A. 2008, Officer wellbeing, satisfaction and commitment : job conditions of Australian law enforcement personnel, in AIRAANZ 2008 : Workers, corporations, and community : facing choices for a sustainable future : proceedings of the 22nd conference of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand, Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand, Melbourne, Vic..

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Title Officer wellbeing, satisfaction and commitment : job conditions of Australian law enforcement personnel
Author(s) Allisey, A.
Rodwell, J.
Noblet, A.
Conference name Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand. Conference (22nd : 2008 : St Kilda, Melbourne, Australia)
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 6-8 February 2008
Title of proceedings AIRAANZ 2008 : Workers, corporations, and community : facing choices for a sustainable future : proceedings of the 22nd conference of the Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand
Editor(s) Stanton, Pauline
Young, Suzanne
Publication date 2008
Conference series Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand Conference
Publisher Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Excessive job stress caused by unreasonably high employer demands, low control over one's own work and limited support can have far-reaching effects for the individual, organisation and community. The present study sought to investigate the relationship between officer working conditions and their self-reported levels of wellbeing, satisfaction and commitment using a well-known job strss model, the demand-control-support (DCS) model. Using a large (N= 2085) sample of law enforcement personnel, findings indicated that social support from work sources was the best predictor, whilst job control and workload both had significant influences on levels of employee wellbeing, satisfaction and commitment. Additionally, non-linear relationships were found between workload and wellbeing and satisfaction, indicating that both high and low levels of workload can produce negative outcomes. The results have implications for job design and management training programs, particularly in reference to social support training and workload models.
Notes v. 1. Refereed papers -- v. 2. Non-refereed papers and abstracts.
ISBN 0980476607
9780980476606
Language eng
Field of Research 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, AIRAANZ
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018241

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.