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The availability of information in knowledge-based economies

Burch, Tony 2006, The availability of information in knowledge-based economies, in Integrating “doing” and “thinking”: KM as reflective practice : proceeding of the Ninth Australian Conference for Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support : ACKMIDS 2006, Australian Scholarly, Melbourne, Vic..

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Title The availability of information in knowledge-based economies
Author(s) Burch, Tony
Conference name Australian Conference of Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support (9th : 2006 : Melbourne)
Conference location Monash University, Caulfield Campus, Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 11-12 December 2006
Title of proceedings Integrating “doing” and “thinking”: KM as reflective practice : proceeding of the Ninth Australian Conference for Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support : ACKMIDS 2006
Editor(s) Burstein, Frada
Linger, Henry
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian Conference on Knowledge Management and Intelligent Decision Support
Publisher Australian Scholarly
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary The use of information is preceded by its availability. For post-industrial economies to exploit information to full potential it is important for knowledge to be free of vested-interest censorship and manipulation. History suggests that a range of vested-interests have manipulated explicit> information availability through various forms of sectarian, state and business manipulation of the systems of information storage and transfer. The OECD 1996 report "The Knowledge-Based Economy" recognized that the diffusion of knowledge was as significant as its creation, and that knowledge distribution networks were crucial to innovation, production processes and product development. The success of enterprises and national economies is considered reliant on the effectiveness of their ability to gather, distribute and utilize knowledge. The increasing need for ready access (of information that might become knowledge) in accordance with the OEDC definition is particularly relevant to this paper as it assumes infrastructures capable of providing that need. Wherever there are infrastructures there are opportunities to benefit from them, either for profit or power. This paper considers the implications of sectarian, state and business-model control over the selective content, storage and dissemination of information and knowledge, both from historical and current perspectives. The advent of new technologies and how they have enabled the flow of information adds new dimensions to knowledge control but the quality of knowledge is less certain and who controls or influences distribution of knowledge less transparent. It could be argued that at each step in the development of knowledge distribution networks, knowledge and its distribution, is not free of the possibility of third-party vested interest.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9781740971935
Language eng
Field of Research 089999 Information and Computing Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2006, Australian Scholarly
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018300

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.