The animal other : horse training in early modernity

Mewett, Peter 2008, The animal other : horse training in early modernity, in TASA 2008 : Re-imagining sociology : the annual conference of The Australian Sociological Association, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic..

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Title The animal other : horse training in early modernity
Author(s) Mewett, Peter
Conference name Australian Sociological Association. Conference (2008 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 2-5 December 2008
Title of proceedings TASA 2008 : Re-imagining sociology : the annual conference of The Australian Sociological Association
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2008
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Publisher University of Melbourne
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary This historical sociological analysis of the training of horses for competition in early modernity draws from the sociology of the body to suggest that animals as we know them are constructed through human social processes. Contemporary horse-care publications are used to demonstrate how equine bodies were shaped through an application of humoral physiological theory. That is, they were made suitable for the human requirements of the time through preparatory procedures informed by models of somatic functioning used widely to understand humans and animals alike. The broader issue canvassed here is that ‘embodiment’ should include animal as well as human bodies. Through selective breeding, raising and care, animals have bodies that are shaped to human requirements – they embody human social processes.
ISBN 9780734039842
Language eng
Field of Research 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018302

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of History, Heritage and Society
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